Only think about Ubah and not gratefulness?

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As the Chinese New Year is nearing, a DAP MP openly asked voters not to return home to share the reunion dinner with parents and the reason given was that the general election is more important than having the reunion meal. It is sad that those I know, including young people, have been so confused with politics that they have told their parents in faraway hometowns that this year, they are not going home for the reunion dinner. But they said they are planning for an oversea trip and not on such grand excuse due to the election.

The reunion dinner has been a most important Chinese tradition since the olden days. The once-a-year dinner is to demonstrate mutual care and respect among family members to bring closer the family ties. The togetherness is to bring spiritual comfort and satisfaction to old parents especially when they see their grandchildren coming home from various places. The younger generation would also take the opportunity to express their gratitude to their parents.

Recently movie director Peter Chan used the IPhone and shot a short film called “Three minutes”. It tells the story of a child and a group of passengers at the railway station rushing home for the Chinese New Year. When the train arrives, passengers rush down and hug their family members joyfully while those waiting to board rush up in order to return home in the far away hometown.

The small child is there just for a one-minute meeting with his mother who works on the train and is unable to return home for the New Year. The short film uses countdown to indicate how precious the meeting between the mother and the child. But then we have politicians in this country who appeal to the young not to return home for the New Year.

With the rise of DAP on March 8, 2008, the Chinese New Year has been in a mess. Every year, DAP will come out with a short CNY film with heavy political flavor. Not only that, they also inject elements of hate and curses into these films.

My friend from another race ask me why the Chinese New Year is so negative. He understands when he was young, the elders always reminded the younger generation to mind their words, not to scold or use bad words because that would bring bad luck for the whole year. However, what he sees on DAP Facebook in recent years are short films either scolding or cursing others. There were many Chinese netizens happily sharing them too. I have no answer to his question.

I can recall at an undergraduates forum when the song by Namewee celebrating the Year of Chicken was played. They asked for my view. The lyrics are radical and sarcastic, mocking the national leaders. It finally ended with rude and violent words.

People said this is art. To me, this is abhorrent and is tantamount to raping the Chinese spring festival culture. The unacceptable piece of work has been circulated on YouTube all over the world. Is it something we are proud of?

Please remember that among the 10 Asean nations, Malaysia is the only country which has preserved the most complete Chinese culture. The Chinese in this country can proudly say that we have the best and the most complete Chinese culture and traditions. It is a pity that all this has changed because of political prejudices.

The Malaysian Chinese community has been obsessed with DAP’s call for “Ubah”. Let’s look back to the last 10 years, the more they talk about a government change, the more the Chinese community suffers. The Chinese political strength in the mainstream has been weakened, worse, we have also sacrificed the legacy of our 5000 years of culture and tradition.

When the young people are sprouting obscenity, when the Spring festival is filled with hatred and curses and when we become an ungrateful community taking things for granted, is it the Ubah that the Chinese want?

Give us back a Chinese New Year with peace, gratefulness and good fortune! In this Spring festival of gratefulness and family love, please don’t fill your heads with all the “Ubah” things and disappoint your elders who have been looking forward to the reunion.